Increased milk production, better herd health, and decisions made with the right information in hand.

 
 

SomaDetect provides dairy farmers with the information they need to save thousands of dollars each year. The benefits span the full operation of the farm - from milk production, to herd health, to feed management, reproduction, and beyond.

SomaDetect provides clear, actionable information that farmers need to save money, save the lives of cows, and to improve farm sustainability.

To understand the economic benefits of SomaDetect, it is critical to understand how farmers are paid. Most farmers receive a monthly milk check based on three key factors:

  • Milk volume (as in, number of pounds of milk)
  • Components present in their milk (as in, the concentration of fat, protein, and milk solids)
  • Milk quality (as in, the number of somatic cells present in the milk)

SomaDetect makes a difference to both the components present, and milk quality. The return on investment for this technology is less than one year on average, and far less for farms with more than 5000 cows.

 

THE SOMADETECT WAY

Jeff gets daily fat content and somatic cell counts from his SomaDetect system. He receives an alert one day that two of his cows, Tessa and Buttercup, have had increasing somatic cell counts over the past week. For the next three days, Tessa and Buttercup are separated from the herd and are milked four times a day instead of two. Both cows get better without spreading the disease to others, and without requiring antibiotic treatment.

BEFORE SOMADETECT

Jeff receives individual measurements of fat content and somatic cell counts on a monthly basis from his local herd recording service organisation. This month, he has six cows with very high somatic cell counts, indicating that they have clinical mastitis. Jeff treats the cows with antibiotics and three of them get better within a week, but three do not. The three that remain sick are sent to slaughter.

 

Tom runs a 900-cow dairy and employs several farm workers. On Tuesday, Tom treated one of his cows with antibiotics. Wednesday morning, one of the farm workers milked the treated cow, and Tom and the farm worker received alerts on their phone and that there was contaminated milk making its way through the milking line. Tom ran to the barn and together with the farm worker was able to stop the milk from getting into the bulk tank. Tom had to clean and decontaminate the milk hosing and part of the stainless steel tubing that went to the bulk tank. It took two hours and $0.75 worth of cleaning products.

Tom runs a 900-cow dairy and employs several farm workers. On Tuesday, Tom treated one of his cows with antibiotics. Wednesday morning, one of the farm workers milked the treated cow, and the antibiotics ended up in the next shipment of milk. Tom’s contaminated milk was caught at the milk processing plant. It was his second time shipping contaminated milk and so Tom must cover the costs himself. Tom loses $16,200 from his own milk shipment, and must also pay $38,000 for dumping the milk in the truck and for cleaning. This is a total revenue loss of $54,200 for Tom and his farm.

 

Sandra is a dairy farmer with a herd of 200 cows. Reproduction is critical on any dairy farm because if cows do not get pregnant regularly, they will stop producing milk. On her farm, Sandra uses sexed semen. This increases the chance that a female calf will be born instead of a male, and female calves are kept to grow the herd size. Sexed semen costs $12 per vial, costing $24 per pregnancy. On average, it takes Sandra two tries to get cows pregnant, because with SomaDetect she is able to identify the precise moment of ovulation, rather than relying on observation or activity trackers. Jolee is now pregnant with her third calf and scheduled to give birth this spring.

 

 

Sandra is a dairy farmer with a herd of 200 cows. Reproduction is critical on any dairy farm because if cows do not get pregnant regularly, they will stop producing milk. On her farm, Sandra uses sexed semen. This increases the chance that a female calf will be born instead of a male, and female calves are kept to grow the herd size. Sexed semen costs $12 per vial. On average, it takes Sandra five tries to get cows pregnant, costing $60 per pregnancy. Sandra has a cow, Jolee, who was inseminated for the fifth time two weeks ago. Jolee is one of Sandra’s best cows; she does not get sick often and produces lots of high-fat milk. Jolee has only had two calves so far, and Sandra is hopeful that she’ll keep producing more calves and more milk. Unfortunately, Sandra found out today that Jolee has not gotten pregnant, even after five tries, and has scheduled her “career change”; next week, a truck will come and take Jolee off farm to be slaughtered and sold for meat.

 

Are you a farmer who knows that SomaDetect can help you make more money? Sign up today.